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GSU Is…

November 30, 2009

What have you learned about yourself and GSU now that the semester is almost over?

Creating Our FYE 1220 Final Exam

November 16, 2009

Questions by Oberazzi.For our Final Exam in FYE 1220, Mackenzie and I would like your help. Let’s develop a list of what you consider to be the most important things you’ve learned, and then turn that list into multiple choice questions. You’ll find out in class which categories you’ll need to write questions for.

Your questions are due before class on Monday, November 30. This assignment counts as part of your participation points in FYE 1220.

Start Writing Questions (clicking this link will bring you to the page where you will enter your questions and answers).

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/oberazzi/318947873/

How to Study for Final Exams

November 16, 2009

final-examsFinal exams are approaching on college campuses around the world. Finals can be stressful, even for the most prepared students. Here are some tips to help you succeed:

Preparing for the Final

  • Find out what your entire final exam schedule is so that you’ll know how many finals you will have on each day.
  • Prepare a written schedule for yourself indicating when you will study for each test. Leave some time in your schedule for exercise and relaxation, too.
  • If the professor offers a study guide, use it.
  • If the professor offers a review session for the exam, go to it.
  • Know if the final is comprehensive (covering everything since the beginning of the semester or quarter).
  • Find out what kind of exam it will be. You’d study differently for a multiple-choice (Scantron) final than an essay (blue book) one.
  • If the final will be taken online, find out if you have to go to a specific computer lab on campus at a specific time, or if you’ll be allowed to take the final on your own computer. Also find out how many chances you will have to take the final. Assume it’s just one chance unless you hear differently from the professor.
  • If you have your previous exams available, scour the exams for things that you think will be on the final. Flag your notes by highlighting or using Post-It notes.
  • Don’t pull an all-nighter. (Though some people are successful with studying all night and then taking a test with no sleep, I wouldn’t recommend you try it for the first time on a final exam.)
  • Calculate your grades in the class. Determine what score you will need to get the grade you’re hoping for in the class. You may discover that you can’t possibly get an A, no matter how well you do on the final, but to get a B, you only need to get a few questions right.
  • If you’re an auditory learner, record yourself reading your notes aloud, then play the recording back several times. (You can use the free online service Utterli for this; simply register with Utterli and then call your assigned phone number with your cell phone to start the recording.)
  • If the exam is an open-book exam, this does not mean that you don’t have to study at all. In fact, one of the most challenging exams I ever took as an undergrad was an open-book essay exam.
  • Consider creating a detailed Final Exam Battle Plan.

On the Day of the Final

  • Eat a meal and drink water.
  • Don’t overdo it with the caffeine.
  • Know what to bring with you to the final. Do you need a blue book? A Scantron? (And if you need a Scantron, which kind do you need?) A pencil? A pen?
  • Are food and drinks allowed in the classroom where your final will be? Sometimes, the rules are different for exam days than other days.
  • Even if you don’t usually wear a watch, take one with you to the final. It’s unlikely you will be able to look at your cell phone during the final.

During the Final

  • For a paper-based exam, read through the entire final exam before you start answering any questions at all. This way, you will know what you’re facing.
  • If the final is an online exam, find out if you can revisit questions, or if after you click past a question you cannot go back to it again.
  • If you’re using a Scantron and you skip a question to finish later, make sure you’re answering your questions next to the correct answers. (When I took my GRE to get into grad school, I skipped a question on the first page of the booklet, but never skipped a number on the Scantron. When I realized it, I only had 10 minutes to go back and put the answers with the correct questions. Talk about stress!)
  • Keep a close eye on the time you have allotted.
  • Some students benefit from answering the most difficult questions first, while others do better completing all the easier ones. Do what works for you.

After the Final

  • Do not share with other students what was on the final exam. In most universities, this is a violation of the honor code.

Now it’s your turn: What final exam tips do you have to share? Please let us know through your comments below.

barbara_is_listening

Photo Credit: http://flickr.com/photos/shaghaghi/73645535/

Social Media Song: Crazy Little Thing The Web

November 3, 2009

A fun little take on social media, done to the tune of Crazy Little Thing Called Love:

Cheap Dates

October 26, 2009

When I was in college, I lived on a really tight budget. Things aren’t much different for many of today’s college students.

Trying to come up with something fun to do on a date, something that doesn’t cost a lot of money, can be a real challenge.

My favorite “cheap date” in college? A stop for ice cream, followed by a walk through Auburn University’s Arboretum. I’ve been married to my college sweetheart for 24 years, so cheap dates can have long-lasting impact!

What are some of your favorite “cheap dates”? Please share your ideas by providing a comment. Thanks!

Watch Out for Digital Dirt

October 19, 2009

Sweep by QualityFrog.When you’re preparing for a job (or internship) search, it’s time to be sure that you don’t have any “digital dirt” that a potential employer may uncover.

Imagine you’re in a job interview right now. How would you answer this question? “After our interview today, I am going to look you up online. How do you think my impression of you will change after I do this?”

Think about what’s visible in your Facebook profile, MySpace page, your blog, Flickr photos, LinkedIn profile and anywhere else that you’ve posted info about yourself. Check to see if others have tagged you in photos. Even if you’ve made your info “private,” it’s still possible that the information is accessible. (Even if a web page is taken down, you may still get to it through the Way Back Machine if you know when it was accessible.)

A discussion on this topic at PR OpenMic brought several things to consider:

” We google/facebook/myspace everyone we hire, and it’s pretty much standard practice out in the trenches.” — Michael Dolan

“I have, in the past, Googled and Facebooked my students before each new semester begins. The stuff I’ve found. So, I copy the photos and, when classes start, put the photos up on the large screen in class as I call roll. My point to them is, “If I can find it, your potential future internships and employers can find it, too.” Freaks them out, but certainly makes the point. Again, only rarely, but still … the stuff I’ve found… yikes!” — Robert French

“A good point a new PR professional brought up when speaking to one of my classes is blocking your friends list from public view. Who you associate with can be digital dirt sometimes.” — Beth Evans

Let me close with a profound thought by a PR practitioner in Washington, DC :

“Just ask yourself: Would they trust their organization’s reputation to someone who can’t keep his or her own intact?” — Felipe Benitez

Just some food for thought.

[Cross-posted from my Public Relations Matters blog.]

Podcasts 101

October 19, 2009
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What is a podcast? Put simply, it’s a recording — either audio or video — that you can play when it’s convenient for you. Podcasts exist on a wide variety of topics, from social media, to sports, to comedy, to news . . . and everything inbetween.

I listen to podcasts during my commute from Savannah to Statesboro, and also when I am walking. Some people prefer to listen to podcasts on their computers; my preference is listening to them on my Palm Pre or iPod. Some of my favorite podcasts are: For Immediate ReleaseInside PR, The Creative CareerMedia Bullseye Radio Roundtable, Trafcom News, Marketing Over Coffee, and Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me.

Here’s a short video on how to subscribe to and download podcasts using iTunes.

If you’re not an iTunes person, you may want to visit Podcast Alley, where you can find thousands more podcasts. You can listen to the podcasts directly from the website.

As a reminder, your 7th required blog post for this class is about podcasts. Please respond (with a comment) to this post when you decide which podcast(s) you’ll listen to for the assignment.